Mazda World Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi, I am but a simple late teens- early 20’s boy who has recently been given a very beautiful, but very base model 1999 Mazda Millenia. I took it upon myself to upgrade the sound system to its highest fidelity (on the cheap). I bought a Pioneer MVH-S322BT, the bestest all around head unit I could supply myself with, and then thought that the best option for speaker upgrades was the Bose speaker set found higher up in the model range. I ended up pulling the rear and door speakers out of a junked 2000 millenia (although I did not grab the amplifier as I didn’t believe it would be needed now that the head unit was different). I’ve already put the rear speakers in, but I’m believing now that I have made a mistake. From what I’ve read the speakers I took out are 4 ohms while the Bose are 2, which I’ve heard could cause me to overdrive them and potentially blow them out. My father who has far more technical knowledge of impedance and all that says I shouldn’t worry too much about blowing them up.... but I’m not sure what direction to follow then! I still have the front door speakers I could put in, but is that even worth it at that point? Do I risk blowing those up? Is it even that big of a deal? Have I dug myself into a corner, please help!
I have the money to put new stuff in need be but I’m really not looking to do anything much more than plug and play. Please give me wisdom!
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
76 Posts
Well. when you are playing music and you begin to push that volume up when you hear the music start to break up and distort don't be an idiot and push it further.

Chances are good you won't blow the speaks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I’m just saying, my threshold now that I’m running lower ohm speakers is very small, distortion seems to be an underlying issue. I’m more worried that installing the front pair will leave me with a more muddy sounding system that is far more fragile. I’m not a bass head or anything, I certainly am not trying to rattle my trunk. I just wanted a better sounding system and if the Bose are going to leave me in a worse position than before, I just wanted the heads up. I also don’t feel like just keeping the volume down is a good position long term.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
76 Posts
I’m just saying, my threshold now that I’m running lower ohm speakers is very small, distortion seems to be an underlying issue. I’m more worried that installing the front pair will leave me with a more muddy sounding system that is far more fragile. I’m not a bass head or anything, I certainly am not trying to rattle my trunk. I just wanted a better sounding system and if the Bose are going to leave me in a worse position than before, I just wanted the heads up. I also don’t feel like just keeping the volume down is a good position long term.
I would do some research in a car sound type of forum that has lots of electronic techs on it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Hi, I am but a simple late teens- early 20’s boy who has recently been given a very beautiful, but very base model 1999 Mazda Millenia. I took it upon myself to upgrade the sound system to its highest fidelity (on the cheap). I bought a Pioneer MVH-S322BT, the bestest all around head unit I could supply myself with, and then thought that the best option for speaker upgrades was the Bose speaker set found higher up in the model range. I ended up pulling the rear and door speakers out of a junked 2000 millenia (although I did not grab the amplifier as I didn’t believe it would be needed now that the head unit was different). I’ve already put the rear speakers in, but I’m believing now that I have made a mistake. From what I’ve read the speakers I took out are 4 ohms while the Bose are 2, which I’ve heard could cause me to overdrive them and potentially blow them out. My father who has far more technical knowledge of impedance and all that says I shouldn’t worry too much about blowing them up.... but I’m not sure what direction to follow then! I still have the front door speakers I could put in, but is that even worth it at that point? Do I risk blowing those up? Is it even that big of a deal? Have I dug myself into a corner, please help!
I have the money to put new stuff in need be but I’m really not looking to do anything much more than plug and play. Please give me wisdom!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Speakers with too low of impedance in your case (2 ohm) put more strain on the AMPLIFIER (built into your head unit), not the speakers themselves perse. I would check the spec sheet on your Pioneer MVH-S322BT to see what impedance range it can tolerate, and then decide. Also keep in mind that these speakers are 20 years old and were pulled from a junked car which my mean they have been exposed to heat or cold and may be brittle or have cracks around the surround. Also as 20-year-old speakers, you don't know what abuse they saw from an owner cranking them too loud (etc). The amp you didn't use was probably Bose sourced as well. This is why the speakers are matched to it. It may also have some EQ dialed in to make them perform.

My recommendation would be to ditch the bose speakers and purchase some aftermarket speakers that are rated at 4 ohms. I am preferential to Infinity Reference as they sound great and are at a decent price point. I would replace all of the speakers to match. If you are into BASS, consider a powered sub to handle that and mount it in the trunk. Trying to pump too much bass out of door and deck speakers will overdrive them and cause them to blow. Another thing that will blow the tweeters is playing at a volume that causes the amp in your unit into "clipping" (when the amp cannot faithfully reproduce the soundwave and cuts it off at the peaks). So watch the volume. If you are hearing distortion, you are doing damage.

I hope this helps a bit.
Chris
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top