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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 2018 Mazda CX-5 GT. I hear a noise mainly coming from the rear of the car.

The noise to me sounds like it could be rear wheel bearing noise. I hope this isn't typical because it's actually quite loud and not something I would expect coming from a car with low miles. While it isn't unbearable I do notice the constant sound while driving. I have also considered maybe its the tires since these tires are original on the car.

Anyone else having these issues?
Thanks
 

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Its kind of hard for anyone to diagnose a cars' noise when they can't hear it. I had a set of original tires go bad after just 32 thousand miles but again don't know what kind of noise you're hearing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Its kind of hard for anyone to diagnose a cars' noise when they can't hear it. I had a set of original tires go bad after just 32 thousand miles but again don't know what kind of noise you're hearing.
I certainly understand that. I almost recorded it to post as a sound file. I suspect the tires are at least partially to blame since when I pull off from a stop sign they squeal with no effort. They simply aren't grabbing the road.Plenty of tread on em.
I'm pretty cheap so I might wring a few more miles out of the tires and put up with the noise for a little while. I think there might also be some slight bearing noise. It doesn't help that for 2019 Mazda said they made the car interior more quiet. I guess it helps if you bought a 2019. I have a 2018.

I might try to take it by a local tire center here and see if it's the tires, but we know where this will end up- "yes you need tires". It's like going to the donut shop and asking them if you should buy a donut.
 

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"yes you need tires". It's like going to the donut shop and asking them if you should buy a donut.
LOL that is a good point! My Mazda dealer were the ones that told me to get new tires. Most mechanics can also use a device to listen to your bearings etc. to see if they are making noise. Don't skimp on your tires if you live in a high snow area like I do. Be safe!
 

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One suggestion might be to do a tire rotation (move the rear tires to the front; fronts to the back) and make sure the tire pressures are at or a bit over recommended pressure. Then go for a test drive. If the noise moves to the front, you might have a 'cupped' tire. When you get new tires you should get an alignment. If the noise stays at the rear, then you'll need to investigate further whether its a bearing or a brake rotor/disc noise. Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Well I got a screw in my rear right tire. Thankfully I was able to find the screw and I have an air compressor at home. One thing I noticed is the rear jack lift point is hard to spot and it doesn't look particularly sturdy. Hopefully I can simply get the tire plugged.
 

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Well I got a screw in my rear right tire. Thankfully I was able to find the screw and I have an air compressor at home. One thing I noticed is the rear jack lift point is hard to spot and it doesn't look particularly sturdy. Hopefully I can simply get the tire plugged.
I got a nail in my tire a few weeks ago and it was plugged by a local mechanic friend of mine. First time I have ever done the plug thing but it seems to be holding up just fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I got a nail in my tire a few weeks ago and it was plugged by a local mechanic friend of mine. First time I have ever done the plug thing but it seems to be holding up just fine.
Glad to hear you were able to get it fixed.
I almost went to Auto Zone and bought a plug kit, but time was precious so I paid for the convenience of getting it done right down the road within a few hours of dropping it off. 35 bucks worth. Probably took them 15 minutes.
Still much less than a new tire. Since cars went to aluminum rims and TPS sensors I have always had issues with small leaks. I don't often pick up a drywall screw though. Went in straight almost like someone stood the screw up under the tire. I don't really believe that's what happened. Should be fine after the repair.
 

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I have a 2018 Mazda CX-5 GT. I hear a noise mainly coming from the rear of the car.

The noise to me sounds like it could be rear wheel bearing noise. I hope this isn't typical because it's actually quite loud and not something I would expect coming from a car with low miles. While it isn't unbearable I do notice the constant sound while driving. I have also considered maybe its the tires since these tires are original on the car.

Anyone else having these issues?
Thanks
I just had the entire rear differential replaced on my 2017 CX5 @ 72K. $3K repair! I was told a seal broke, and then it was just a matter of time. I had noises from the rear too. Initially, I thought it was brake pads that were rubbing, then I thought it could be rear wheel bearings, but it turned out to be grinding from the rear differential. Very disappointing!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks @BernieAndersen for the FYI. This makes me want to crawl under the car and take a look at my differential.

Sorry to hear of your misfortune. I hope this isn't my issue. FWIW I don't have grinding. My noise more like a hum. It isn't terribly loud but I noticed it as being loud compared to my other cars.

-Tim
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
UPDATE- The issue with my car was definitely the tires. While a new tire change is expensive, I was pleased with the results. Road noise was greatly reduced. No more tire 'whine' noise.

The car is now so stable I was doing 80mph and it felt like I was going 65mph. The mechanic put on Bridgestone tires. Before this my favorite brand was Michellin tires. I hope these last for awhile before I need another tire change.
I had been under the impression tread wear was the only reason to replace tires. If the rubber on cheaper tires gets hard, they loose traction and make lots of noise when driving.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
One suggestion might be to do a tire rotation (move the rear tires to the front; fronts to the back) and make sure the tire pressures are at or a bit over recommended pressure. Then go for a test drive. If the noise moves to the front, you might have a 'cupped' tire. When you get new tires you should get an alignment. If the noise stays at the rear, then you'll need to investigate further whether its a bearing or a brake rotor/disc noise. Good luck!
This was good advice.
I had my tires rotated and the noise moved from the back to the front. The mechanic said if it was his car he would replace all four. I didn't buck his advice.I don't want to be back for two tires a short time later so I decided to replace all of them.
The last time I heard, tires should be rotated every 12,000 miles or so. I'll probably have them rotated every 3rd oil change so they wear evenly front to back.
 
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