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The PIAA Super Plasma supposed to be much better than the Super white. I used to have on my 2000 Mill, but replaced it with a CATZ Galaxy. The Super white is still a lot better than the stock bulb, but definitely still a bit yellowish, while the CATZ has no yellow at all, a bit purpleish actually. I would've bought the PIAA Super Plasma if not for the price; about $110 compared to CATZ of about $58.

Go to this place for more info about bulbs
http://www.autobulbdepot.com/fr_bulb_faq.t...185203541043402
 

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The Plasma has a stronger burn then the Supers. Therefore, more closer to HID.
 

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I bought a set of Piaa Super Plasma, and they just didn't look too good on my projector lights (Australian Millenia). They were quite yellow and purple, so I ended up switching back to my Eaglites, which gave a very nice pure white/blue appearance with no hint of yellow.

I dunno, most people swear by the Super Plasmas but I wasn't too impressed with them. But then again my set up is different becaue I have seen them on the reflective headlights and they don't look too bad. Anyone interested in buying a set of 9006 Piaa Super Plasma headlights?
 

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i see alot of cheap xenon lights on ebay claiming they were 5000 kelvin? is that for real or should i stick with the expensive (piaa) bulbs? if anyone has experience with the cheaper ones please reply .,,. thanx,.,.
 

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I have had cheaper ones and they tend to burn out quicker, or they look really bright from a distance, but when your in the car and the road is wet you can't see anything. I had some cheap ones I bought from ebay and I didn't like them. They sucked and then one burnt out so I bought the PIAA's
 

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I purchased the Piaa Super Whites for my 2002 Millenia and didn't really notice a difference. The only difference I saw was in the color of the light. The Piaas were whiter while the stock ones had that yellow tint to them. So I got tired of the Piaas and went with the HID's. Wow, what a difference! There's nothing that can even compare to HID's. Honestly it is worth the money!
 

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Originally posted by 95MiLLy@Nov 15 2002, 02:17 AM
i see alot of cheap xenon lights on ebay claiming they were 5000 kelvin? is that for real or should i stick with the expensive (piaa) bulbs? if anyone has experience with the cheaper ones please reply .,,. thanx,.,.
go with the HID conversion... it rocks in my opinion. you can just see the difference when you compared it to the regular halogens , or even the PIAA's for that matter...

regarding the HID bulbs, if you get the 4100K ones, those are the ones that most cars run stock... they have the highest luminescence rating... go higher to something like 6000k, 8000, and suposedly even the 12000k, all ure doing is getting the light to turn bluer and bluer... u lose the amount of area ure lighting up though... 4100k is the optimal

the conversion is about 400 for the pair (thats a really good deal, regular is i think 600 for the pair... some are even worse, 400for one set!!... quite gay)

they say that u can also go with the sylvania bulbs if u dont want the HIDS, or PIAAs, supposedly brighter... dont know if thats true or not though
 

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I have worked for almost 20 years in the lighting industry - so I'll give you a bit of basic info on halogen lamps and vision...

The output from a halogen lamp is typically about 3000K, which is not very blue at all. All Halogen lamps have very little blue, the main output is in InfraRed (heat), tapering down thru the spectrum to nothing in UltraViolet.

You can make higher output, and increase the colour temperature (make it "whiter") by driving the lamp harder (eg: an 11V lamp run on 12V will give more light, but the life will be shorter. The correlation is that for ever 5% over voltage, you halve the lamp life. This is probably why the el-cheapo lamps don't last long - they are over-running them to get the light whiter. This is also why "high output" halogens have a shorter lifetime (typically 250 hrs vs 500hrs for std halogens)

There are some new techologies that allow higher output and higher colour temperatures - this is based on the Osram (and philips) IRC technology. But *NO* halogen lamp will give a blue light as standard (there just isn't any blue light in them).

So, to make the light blue, you must use a tinted glass envelope. Since the output of the lamp is primarily red/yellow, the only way to get a blue coloured light is to BLOCK (filter) the red and yellow out. That means a BIG reduction in light output...

So, whilst these blue coloured lamps look cool, the output is reduced compared to what can be achieved with a clear envelope lamp ! Furthermore, the human eye is FAR more sensitive to yellow light than blue or red... therefore, you can see better in yellow light - which means you need less "power" using yellow light to get the same visibility ( that make sense? )

The "lumen" value actually allows for the response of the eye - so you can use the lamp's lumen outputs to compare the VISIBLE output of the lamps... it is important not to confuse lumens with colour temperature... the higher the lumen value, the brighter the light will be (to your eye), yet to produce the same lumens from a 5000K lamp takes a lot more power than from a 3000K halogen lamp ! (dunno if that made sense, it's hard to explain)

There are a number of other issues, including the fact that red-yellow light is far less easily scattered. So if there is dust or moisture (fog or rain) in the air, the beam penetration will be far worse for blue coloured lamps. If you want to REALLY see well, use more YELLOW light, not more blue light.

The reason that Metal Halide lamps are blue is because the gasses that make blue light are easy to obtain. The problem with HID lamps is getting the colour temperature down and colour rendering (ability to illuminate ALL colours) better. It is expensive and difficult to get good colour in Red/Yellow from Metal Halide lamps - even the most state-of-the-art M.Halide lamps have a non-continuous spectrum, and a dip in output of reds. Because of the non-continuos spectrum, the MH lamps tend to appear more "blue" compared to Halogen.

MH lamps have far better luminous efficiency than Halogen - you get more lumens per watt. Headlight reflectors are usually made of plastic - Hence you can cram more MH light into the headlight because it makes less heat.

To summarise - blue-tinted halogen lamps are a "FAD" - a fashion item - they are not a better lighting source ! Choose the halogen lamps with the highest LUMEN output... and preferably NOT a blue colour (the highest output lamps will not be blue anyway)...

JC
 

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they could possibly use a noble gas that could produce colors withing the highest lumen spectrum as u were mentioning... the way that HID works is that first u need an alternating current... which is why the DC adapter in the cars with halogens cant be used

current is passed through the gas causing an excitatory state for the electrons and as the current is passed back, the electrons return to their normal state and the energy that they release from dropping from the higher state to the normal state is shown as a bluish discharge of light

so maybe if they find another gas that cud get better luminescence out of it, xenons are here to stay for a while (plus they last longer than typical halogen bulbs)
 

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Originally posted by Eternal TL2k3@Nov 20 2002, 07:50 PM
they could possibly use a noble gas that could produce colors withing the highest lumen spectrum as u were mentioning... the way that HID works is that first u need an alternating current... which is why the DC adapter in the cars with halogens cant be used

current is passed through the gas causing an excitatory state for the electrons and as the current is passed back, the electrons return to their normal state and the energy that they release from dropping from the higher state to the normal state is shown as a bluish discharge of light

so maybe if they find another gas that cud get better luminescence out of it, xenons are here to stay for a while (plus they last longer than typical halogen bulbs)
I'm guessing that cost is the main factor here. There are probably other gases that shine brighter than xenon under the same conditions, but they're also probably a lot more expensive to isolate and package within the relatively harsh environment of an automobile.

As it is, I burned out one of my low beams a while ago. Wanting to upgrade, I opted for the next-step halogen bulb rather than the equivalent "blue" version. The new bulbs seem to be just a hair brighter, and with a slightly better range of vision to the sides (especially notable on a couple of non-lighted roads that I travel on occasionally).

I'm glad to know that the eight bucks I saved by going with the "super-white" and not the "blue" bulbs was justified. Thanks, John!

Duncan ;D
 

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maybe next time if u burn them out u can go with the sylvania bulbs... cheaper than the PIAAs and supposed to be as bright too (still say to go HID though)
 

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FOR MOST OF MY MILLENIA OWNERS.....
You can go with the PIAA Xtreme Wite. It works for me and I have had people even think that i have HID. I have been thinking of getting HID, but the PIAA Xtreme white lights will do for now.
;) "the man will getcha!" ;)
 
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