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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay Shayaan. Here we go:

What type of engine will the RX8 have? I know it's rotary but is it turbocharged or normally aspirated? Horsepower?

Transmission Choices?

What performance is expected? 0-60/Quarter mile/Topspeed

Specs on Wheels & tires?

How much will it cost?
 

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Engine Type:
1.3L 2 Rotor Wankel Rotary Engine (Naturally Aspirated)
250 horsepower @ 8500
162 lb/ft torque @ 7500

0-60: estimated 5.6-5.8 seconds
1/4 Mile: 14-14.5
Topspeed: good freakin question :)
Wheels and Tires: Dunlops (as far as the car show model had), 18 inch Z rated tires. 225/45/ZR18s (if my memory serves me)

Cost: no more than 30k. Expect a 6 speed manual to be a tad under, maybe at 28k or 29k.

I already put a deposit on it... will take delivery in May.
 

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And let's all remember that, thanks to the rotary's three power chambers, the effective displacement of a 1.3-liter rotary works out to around 3.9 liters ( (w00t) ) with a regular piston engine.

Which is the same size as the current Thunderbird's V8, but the RX-8 probably has a more impressive power curve - not to mention a higher rev range.

Can't wait to hear the sound of a rotary engine again...

Duncan :D - gotta love technology



Last edited by hondaboy81 at Sep 27 2002, 05:11 PM
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the info Shayaan.

I had the pleasure of driving a friends 1988 RX7 GT back in its day. He had to serve for two weeks so I got to drive his car that long. Man was it a great sportscar. I remember the suspension was extremely stiff (it had the sport suspension) and there was barely any body roll. But it was that rotary engine that got me hooked. Man! It was turbine smooth all the way to its 8k RPM redline. The car was quick too. 0-60 in 8 sec. Back then, that was fast. I know. I know. Today's Jeep Grand Cherokees do that on a bad day but like I said, that was then and this is now. I got so hooked on the Japanese sportscar thing that I ended up getting the Mitsu Starion ESI-R (couldn't afford the RX7). I actually raced my friend and his RX7 in that car. We were always head to head. One time at 2 AM out on the Interstate we did a topspeed run side by side (Yeah. Stupid!) and both cars hit an indicated 130 mph and we were just nose to nose! Ha-ha! That was a blast.
 

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Originally posted by hondaboy81@Sep 27 2002, 06:11 PM
And let's all remember that, thanks to the rotary's three power chambers, the effective displacement of a 1.3-liter rotary works out to around 3.9 liters ( (w00t) ) with a regular piston engine.

Which is the same size as the current Thunderbird's V8, but the RX-8 probably has a more impressive power curve - not to mention a higher rev range.

Can't wait to hear the sound of a rotary engine again...

Duncan :D - gotta love technology
There are also 2 rotors.. so technically it would be more :p
 

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Originally posted by Shayaan@Sep 28 2002, 04:48 PM
There are also 2 rotors.. so technically it would be more :p
Well, sort of. I'm fuzzy on the rotary-to-piston size conversion thing, but I believe it has to do with the total swept volume of both rotors (1.3 liters), multiplied by three to match the potential power output from three near-simultaneous power strokes (when compared to a piston engine). Thus, 1.3 liters from the new Renesis, multiplied by three equals 3.9 liters. And I think 250hp is either conservative, or Mazda has plans to add extra power in the future. (Can anyone say "turbo"? B) )

The only reason those sort of comparison figures exist is to appease the defenders of piston engines - namely, the European and Japanese lawmakers who whined when the original RX-7's tiny 1.1-liter displacement allowed it to get away with economy-car tax status in many locations. Since it was fairly obvious that the RX-7 was not an economy car ( :) ), Mazda relented and agreed to let the car be reclassified under the odd "times-three" formula. Thus, the original 1.1-liter twin-rotor was regarded as a 3.3-liter engine for legal purposes, if not logical ones.

Duncan :D - not that any of that matters
 

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Good tech info, if not specs, on the new Renesis engine from Mazdaspeed's "Driving Technology" page:

RENESIS - The Future of the Rotary Engine

For rotary engine enthusiasts, the next exciting phase in the great engine's history has already begun. At the Tokyo Motor Show in October 1999, Mazda unveiled the RX-Evolv, a concept vehicle which later evolved into the MAZDA RX-8 four-door, four-seat sports car unveiled in January 2001 at the North American International Auto Show (NAIAS) in Detroit. The Evolv and the MAZDA RX-8 shared many advances in common, not the least of which was the latest version of the rotary engine called "RENESIS."

The MAZDA RX-8 with its RENESIS rotary engine will make its debut in 2003.

When developing the RENESIS, Mazda's engineers aimed to retain power output on a par with the turbocharged 13B-REW, the rotary engine that powers the Mazda RX-7, while offering improved fuel economy and reduced emissions.

Side Intake and Exhaust Ports

Unlike previous mass-production rotary engines, which employed side exhaust ports and peripheral intake ports, the naturally aspirated RENESIS has intake and exhaust ports in the side housings. This configuration eliminates overlap between the opening of the intake and exhaust ports, enhancing combustion efficiency. The intake ports are 30% larger and their timing has been changed to make them open sooner than in previous designs. Moreover, the exhaust ports open later, resulting in a longer power (expansion) stroke and providing radically improved heat efficiency.

At the same time, the RENESIS uses a six-port induction (6PI) design, in which each rotor employs three intake ports, and a variable intake timing mechanism. Under this system, dedicated high-speed intake ports begin to operate when the engine operates at high-rev levels. This makes it possible to use the intake's dynamic effect at high and low speeds to maximize compression efficiency.

Unlike the single peripheral port per rotor of previous designs, the RENESIS uses two exhaust ports per rotor. This produces a combined exhaust port opening area nearly twice as large and results in a substantial reduction in exhaust resistance.

The rotors have also been made lighter for better performance at high-rev levels. The rotors used in the RENESIS weigh approximately 14% less than those used in the engine that powers the Mazda RX-7, which is sold in Japan.

These enhancements provide high output rivaling the power of turbocharged rotary engines with linear power characteristics from the low- to the high-rev range.

Fuel Efficiency

The increased heat efficiency resulting from zero overlap between the opening of the intake and exhaust ports makes it possible for the RENESIS to run on a leaner fuel mixture than conventional rotary engines. When idling, the RENESIS consumes 40% less fuel than the latest production rotary engine.

Reciprocating piston engines generally use a richer fuel mixture under high-speed and high-load conditions to prevent knocking. In contrast, rotary engines do not require a particularly rich fuel mixture under these conditions due to their special combustion characteristics. In addition, the RENESIS achieves nearly complete combustion over the entire speed range thanks to its high compression ratio and the use of new fuel injectors designed for improved fuel atomization. These enhancements allow the RENESIS to run on a leaner fuel mixture than conventional rotary engines from the low to the high-rev range. The result is the power and performance of a sports car engine and reduced fuel consumption.

Low Emissions

Due to their configurations, rotary engines produce less nitroxide (NOx) than reciprocating piston engines, but they also tend to produce large amounts of unburned hydrocarbons. The side exhaust layout used in the RENESIS prevents unburned hydrocarbons of the combustion chamber housing from escaping to the exhaust ports.

Instead, they are carried over and burned in the next combustion cycle, dramatically reducing emissions. In addition, air injection directed into the combustion chamber increases the efficiency of the exhaust reaction, significantly over Mazda's existing system during engine startup. Together with the double-skin exhaust manifold, the new layout makes the exhaust much hotter when it reaches the catalytic converter, speeding the converter reaction for clean emissions from the moment the engine is started.

Low Center of Gravity

With their low center of gravity rotary engines have an advantage over reciprocating piston engines. We have exploited this benefit by using a special oil pan configuration to make the engine's center of gravity even lower.

Called the "wet sump" layout, it uses a baffle (dividing panel) within the oil pan to prevent oil from collecting on one side during cornering. This makes it possible to use a shallower oil pan. The new oil pan is only about 40 mm thick, about half the thickness of conventional designs.

Reduced Oil Consumption

In a rotary engine, oil is supplied directly to the interior walls of the combustion chamber to lubricate the "apex" and "corner" seals. Engineers kept the paths which supply oil in the RENESIS as small as possible, and we have redesigned the oil supply nozzles to improve their efficiency. With these enhancements, the RENESIS consumes about half as much oil as a conventional rotary engine.

Superb Response and Sound to Thrill the Senses

The RENESIS achieves a sophisticated balance between high revs and high output, on the one hand, and fuel economy and low emissions, on the other. In addition, engineers are working to enhance the performance and to realize the high degree of reliability and durability required in a mass-production sports car. Mazda's engineers wanted to achieve high output in the range of 250 horsepower.

Unlike rotary engines equipped with peripheral exhaust ports, the side layout of the RENESIS produces clear, transparent high tones and powerful low tones. Mazda recognizes engine sound as a key element in any sports car, and engineers are working to ensure that the engine produces a satisfying roar as you depress the accelerator.
Duncan :D - good to know
 

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Well granted the rotary is pretty cool, im not that impressed with the acceleration times of the car... the Z is faster in both regards to the 60 and the 1/4mile... lets just hope that it can match up with handling
 

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Originally posted by Eternal TL2k3@Nov 12 2002, 09:00 PM
Well granted the rotary is pretty cool, im not that impressed with the acceleration times of the car... the Z is faster in both regards to the 60 and the 1/4mile... lets just hope that it can match up with handling
I'll wait till Car and Driver get their hands on it.. their 0-60 times should be very competitive with the 350Z, specially since the Z advertised 5.9 when it was first released.. Mazda is advertising 6 seconds. If they can get it down a notch then it's more or less the same.. maybe .1 or .2 seconds shy. Fast enough for me.
 

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right now a civic shud be fast enough for u, that milly aint haulin no a$$
 

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Originally posted by Eternal TL2k3@Nov 12 2002, 09:19 PM
right now a civic shud be fast enough for u, that milly aint haulin no a$$
You can say ass here, no censorship so long as it stays clean and no name callin :)

Milly is slow for me, but I have to be patient and wait it out.. May or June I'll be a happier camper.
 

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milly running like a pregnant shamu running after a donut
 
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