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Depends totally on how you drive.

I personally keep it off, because then the car doesn't try braking around a hard turn and lets it slide.. but if you can't control the slides then... keep it on :)
 

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If you are trying to get on it... TCS can be a pain because the second your wheels start spinning it cuts back the throttle. As long as you drive smart though, you should be able to control your own car whether you are getting on it or not. I will say this, the Millenia can be scary at times so either be really careful or keep TCS on :)
 

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Originally posted by SPOO@Sep 4 2002, 07:25 AM
Thanks for your insight! But what difference in terms of performance does the TCS add or take away from the Millenia? Does it slow down the car or make it sluggish? Or does it smoothen the ride?
Since the Millenia is a FWD car, if the rear end slides it's difficult to control (you have to use steering input and brake/throttle to get it back in alignment). However, the TCS will feel the spin and apply brakes and try to get you back into control.

While this is the safest way to drive, it's not the most fun, because I tear my car to shreds taking it around hard turns, and I like to let it slide. But I've more-or-less mastered my Millenia, and I can judge how to take the slide... If you're a more cautious driver, leave it on.
 

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The traction control will ONLY kick in when the front wheel(s) lose grip. It's not going to affect anything if the wheels aren't spinning, and then it only cuts torque and then more easily applies it back to prevent wheel spin. Unless you're driving like a goober, you won't notice it.
 

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i have a '99 S and from my expirience is (TCS off) gives some more noticable power at the pedal than (TCS on), but its really not all that much difference. i took me a few months when i got my milly to even notice it. i usually keep (TCS off) when i wanna have some fun and do some turns, and (TCS on) when i dont really care, or its wet out. by default TCS is (on) when the engine starts. hope that helps



the TCS on the milly seens to be much better than the TL :p
 

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Man I feel like a spud. Although I have never had this car on the track, I have never even noticed the TCS ever doing anything except on snow or ice. I've had the car slide a little (mild oversteer) once or twice on the street. I think this car has very high limits for the street, either that or I am just getting old.
 

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I was watching CART the other morning, and they were talking about traction control. I was under the impression the brakes were the traction control, braking on the wheel that was slipping etc. They were talking on those cars the ignition purposly misses(engine running rough) therefore gaining traction. My question is the missing ignition, Is that practical for street cars or is just for the 'beasts' on the CART circut? And what system does the milly have?
 

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Heres a little more info about each system I found:


There are three types of traction control, and we'll briefly outline each system.
1) Limited-slip differential.
This system transfers engine torque to the wheel that has the best traction in any given situation. It is not an electronic system, and generally doesn't perform as well as newer types of traction control. Modern limited-slip differentials are able to transfer power to the good wheel before slippage occurs, however, if both wheels are on a slippery surface, this system will leave you just as stuck as a car without it.
2) Brake System Traction Control.
Working just like ABS in reverse, this type of system uses the same sensors and hardware that ABS does to apply the brakes and keep a wheel from spinning. Each wheel is individually controlled, making this setup a perfect match for a variety of slippery surfaces. Generally inexpensive and highly effective, this system is designed for low speed slippage. Because the braking components are used, higher speed slip control would generate too much friction and heat, damaging the braking components.
3) Drive train Traction Control.
Our Thunderbird was equipped with this system, which retards power delivery to the slipping wheel or wheels at any speed. Using the same ABS-type sensors as the brake system traction control set-up, this one employs a processor that will do one of four things:
(a) close the throttle, which is how the cheapest of these systems works;
(B) cut the fuel supply;
© retard spark timing; or
(d) shut down cylinders. The most advanced drive train traction control systems will do all of these things, plus push the accelerator against your foot to tell you it's working. Because this system cuts power in all slippery situations, a button is almost always provided to turn the system off for situations where slippage is desired.
 

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im not sure which system the milly has, but i definitly like it. i floored it on the sipperiest roads and it just gripped like a beast.
 
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